notoriousrbg
notoriousrbg:

"Ruth Bader Ginsburg had to have her new moniker, Notorious R.B.G., explained to her by her clerks. But you can’t always count on clerks to really understand rap. So a new amicus brief filed by Clay Calvert on behalf of Nielson and Kubrin, together with the Marion B. Brechner First Amendment Project at the University of Florida in Gainesville, presents the history and essence of rap music."
Dahlia Lithwick, Schooling the Supreme Court on Rap Music, Slate (Sept. 17, 2014).

Best

notoriousrbg:

"Ruth Bader Ginsburg had to have her new moniker, Notorious R.B.G., explained to her by her clerks. But you can’t always count on clerks to really understand rap. So a new amicus brief filed by Clay Calvert on behalf of Nielson and Kubrin, together with the Marion B. Brechner First Amendment Project at the University of Florida in Gainesville, presents the history and essence of rap music."

Dahlia Lithwick, Schooling the Supreme Court on Rap Music, Slate (Sept. 17, 2014).

Best

camelathompson

camelathompson:

Sometimes the most memorable characters play minor parts, or were originally intended to play minor parts. Janet Evanovich is a fine artist when is comes to creating characters who are memorable, quirky, but not overdone. Grandma Mazur and Lulu are amongst my favorites, but some of the creeps…

Daphne the Bunny & friends in Susan Elizabeth Phillip’s This Heart of Mine

camelathompson
they-hide-in-the-dark:

Faoladh -
An Irish werewolf, the Faoladh is different from other European werewolves as it is not a monster at all. Unlike other werewolves it is a shapeshifter who can turn into a wolf at will. It is believed that they were pagans who were cursed by St Patrick for refusing to convert to Christianity. A Faoladh looks like a normal wolf. If they are attacked in their wolf form they will still have the tell tale injuries on their human body. If they kill a sheep or cow the blood will still remain on their faces when they turn back into a human. 
Unlike other werewolves, the Faoladh is a good werewolf. It has been known to protect children, wounded men and lost people. They usually live in pairs. They sometimes live as wolves for seven year periods. They can also heal the sick and wounded, and have been known to guide lost strangers to safety.  According to ancient sources, Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings during times of war. Faoladh have the same predatory nature as normal wolves. They will eat farm animals and prey on herds of cattle and sheep for food. 
Faoladh refuse to attack humans. If attacked or surprised while in their wolf form they will simply run away because being injured can cause them to shift back into their more vulnerable human form.

they-hide-in-the-dark:

Faoladh -

An Irish werewolf, the Faoladh is different from other European werewolves as it is not a monster at all. Unlike other werewolves it is a shapeshifter who can turn into a wolf at will. It is believed that they were pagans who were cursed by St Patrick for refusing to convert to Christianity. A Faoladh looks like a normal wolf. If they are attacked in their wolf form they will still have the tell tale injuries on their human body. If they kill a sheep or cow the blood will still remain on their faces when they turn back into a human. 

Unlike other werewolves, the Faoladh is a good werewolf. It has been known to protect children, wounded men and lost people. They usually live in pairs. They sometimes live as wolves for seven year periods. They can also heal the sick and wounded, and have been known to guide lost strangers to safety.  According to ancient sources, Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings during times of war. Faoladh have the same predatory nature as normal wolves. They will eat farm animals and prey on herds of cattle and sheep for food. 

Faoladh refuse to attack humans. If attacked or surprised while in their wolf form they will simply run away because being injured can cause them to shift back into their more vulnerable human form.

victoriadahl

victoriadahl:

Oh, look! There was a study in 2008 that “revealed clear anatomical differences between women who said they experienced vaginal orgasms and a group of women who did not. The scans identified a region of thicker tissue where the G spot was rumoured to be lurking, which was not visible in the…

Victoria Dahl for President of Everything